17 July 2008

Them and Us


Two photos in the inbox. The one above is from my mate Lasse, who took this shot in Paris on a well-deserved city break. Bike rims in a Parisian trash can.

This photo is from Priya Mani, who lives in Copenhagen and works with textile design and sustainability. She blogged this photo on her blog. A photo of an Indian weaver using a bicycle wheel.

First world. Third world. Missed opportunities.

6 comments:

Grendel said...

Too bad she couldn't salvage a fork for the wheel...that would be a smooth turning spinning wheel.

Priya Mani said...

Repurposing bicycle parts is very common practise, very often it is salvaged from scrap (probably she could not find the fork!!) and put to use in innovative new ways.

obimomkenobi said...

It is truly shameful the things we westerners throw away. I'll think of this the next time I've got my hand on the trash bin's lid. Thanks for a very visual reminder.

2whls3spds said...

My rims only hit the recycle bin when they have be determined to be totally unusable for any purpose!

Aaron

Emily said...

Too bad she couldn't salvage a fork for the wheel...that would be a smooth turning spinning wheel.

If you click through to the original blog post... it already is a spinning wheel. A charka is one of the first sorts of spinning wheels invented, and has been around for at least 1000 years. Nice efficient machines.

If you look closely, you can see that she's using the wheel to drive a skeining device... It's a process that you have to do often when handspinning, so having a machine to speed it up is great fun. When I spin, I have to do it by hand. Most European wheels aren't set up so they can run a skeining device of any sort. Charkas almost always include a skeining device. They also spin ferociously fast compared to most European wheels.

Michelle Helena Cabrera said...

Those bike rims are still useful in so many ways. Like they said, one's trash is another one's treasure. My best friend and I once did a project where we needed a couple of bike rims, so we rented skip bins in Perth to collect the ones we can find in the dump. Thanks to 'garbage', our project was a success.