06 October 2008

The Green Wave Spreads

The Green Wave
We have previously written about The Green Wave for cyclists that started on Nørrebrogade street last year. The idea, in summary, is that if you cycle 20 km/h you'll hit green lights the whole way into the city centre.

The 35,000 cyclists on Nørrebrogade have taken the wave to heart. The average speed on the stretch - and in Copenhagen in general - was 15.5 km/h. It is now 20.3 km/h where the Green Wave carries the cycling crowds.

There are safety advantages in play, as well as general convenience. Cyclists who raced along the route at higher speeds have lowered their pace in order to catch all the lights. Good for safety.

The Green Wave has proved to be such a massive success that it has now been extended to two other main stretches leading to the city centre.

The Green Wave will carry 18,000 cyclists a day on Østerbrogade and 17,000 on Amagerbrogade.

The traffic lights are coordinated during the morning rush hour between 06:00 - 10:00/12:00 [depending on the route] and then the wave reverses so the lights are coordinated in the opposite direction between 12:00/15:00 - 18:00 for the trip home.

The concept has now been adopted in Amsterdam.

4 comments:

Alexander said...

Just would like to point you to a map of Copenhagen which is free (both as in beer and as in freedom) that you can legally use for your blogging: www.openstreetmap.org. It's a Wiki map of the world, and there's even a bikemap being constructed - everybody can help.

Cheers,
Alex

njh said...

What is the significance of the speeds (15.5 and 20.3km/h). I've converted them to mph, m/s and furlongs/fortnight with no obvious round numbers. Are these speeds that are especially easy on a bike or something?

I'm Not Superman said...

Yup, I find those number to be the most convenient for bike riding, not too fast that exhaust the rider, yet not too slow that it retain the momentum for cruising.

Greeting from Indonesia
njh said...

What is the significance of the speeds (15.5 and 20.3km/h). I've converted them to mph, m/s and furlongs/fortnight with no obvious round numbers. Are these speeds that are especially easy on a bike or something?

Zakkaliciousness said...

thanks, alexander.

njh: there is no signifigance, really. The average speed of 15.5 is just the average speed of cyclists. perhaps it's interesting to some. Hundreds of thousands of cyclists when riding through a city settle on this 15 km/h average.

for convenience, i suppose. and creating the green wave raises that rush hour speed - and lowers it for those who ride to fast.