06 December 2008

Copenhagenizing Gone Wrong


Like I mentioned on the post about Sydney's half-arsed attempts to implement bicycle infrastructure, it doesn't do much good if you don't go all the way. My mate Joel took this shot in Torino, Italy. Great bike lanes and then a No Cycling sign. Hmm. I'll admit that I don't know the details of this location. Perhaps this spot is a one-off. There are many cities in Italy that are well ahead of the game regarding bike infrastructure. Flat cities and hilly cities alike. Nevertheless, this is a good example of how to do it wrong.

City planners with good intentions but without the political backing to go all the way?


This shot is from Hamish in Toronto. Another example of duh. Although this is a behavourial issue more than anything, that bike lane could easily be graded - raised up with a kerb - to physically separate it from the traffic. Oh... and buy yourselves some bike lane snowploughs.

11 comments:

town mouse said...

I take it you've seen this...

I think it's this sort of thing, more than lycra, even (whisper it) more than compulsory helmets, that stops people cycling like normal people on normal bikes. I think, if we get the facilities, the cycle culture will follow, and not the other way round

czyk said...

It is universal and uncontested practice in Minsk.

http://img354.imageshack.us/img354/5691/img0114fs0.jpg

Another picture about barriers on bikepaths

http://img395.imageshack.us/img395/7015/zukavadt5.jpg

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_7Z2wGEAv9qw/R9WB-ru9oMI/AAAAAAAAA8Y/cGaNYAIFcfQ/IMG_0155.jpg

all are form http://blrovar.blogspot.com/

Zakkaliciousness said...

indeed, town mouse. each and every time i'll say "just look at Paris." if you build it, they will come.

czyk... i see the point, but look at that first photo! brilliant bike lanes! in MINSK! home of Europe's last dictator!

czyk said...

Brillian? Its interesting. But what about strange signs & bad asphalt?

If still interesting - all bykepaths of “home of Europe's last dictator” with links to photos (& posts, but in belarusan) you can find at this map:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&oe=UTF8&t=h&msa=0&msid=117411102561163783396.000452825d287c5220e89&ll=53.90272,27.549591&spn=0.202675,0.55275&z=11

In your blog I almost always look at bikee lanes photos with envy.

anabananasplit said...

Actually, that's not a "no cycling" sign, at least if it has the same meaning it does in Portugal. Here it means "end of the mandatory path for cyclists". You can keep on riding your bike even if there's no bike-only way, you know? :-) A few images of our politicians' grasp of "cycling infrastructure" here in Portugal, available here.

Kiwehtin said...

The first Bielorussian picture has a similar sign but it wouldn't make much sense as a sign banning separated bike and pedestrian lanes, though it would as an "end of..." sign. I just checked a couple of web sites about European traffic signs and the right down to left red slash seems to be the standard way of indicating the end of whatever is required on the sign. I remember road signs in France with a similar slash through a town's name meaning that you are crossing out of the town limits.

disgruntled said...

Here in the UK they actually have 'cyclist dismount' signs at the end of bike lanes - sometimes for a whole six feet

Here's hoping they adopt the 'bike lane of dreams' strategy soon...

Peter said...

This is the same here in Budapest :(

But on the first pic, that's not a No Cycling sign, but an "End of Cycle lane" sign, which means you can continue on your bike, but beyond that sign, thats not only for bikes anymore...

We are fighting for bike lanes at least half as good as they are in CPH! And there is hope, just check this out (sorry, text is Hungarian, but the pictures speak for themselves): http://kerekagy.blog.hu/2008/08/21/kiserleti_jellegu_bringaut_a_parlamentnel

njh said...

czyk, none of those minsk pictures seemed particularly egregious, as you have such lovely wide bike paths!

Compared with a San Jose bike lane (a painted strip about 20cm from the kerb, filled with broken glass and a surface that makes cobblestones seem smooth) your lanes seem the carbon fibre frame of bike lanes. Some bike paths have walls across them at the bottom of long down hill stretches, just to add some excitement.

Ryan (green.ryder) said...

About that Toronto picture. Same thing happens where I am. I live across Lake Ontario (from Toronto) and we got our first bit a snow yesterday.
Majority of the snow from the roads was pushed onto the bike lanes. Forcing cyclists to either ride in the middle of the road, sidewalk or take their chances in the bike lane.
Ironically, roads without bike lanes were much easier to ride on, as they were cleared completely to the curb.

Pippi said...

The Toronto picture makes me laugh (sadly). Here in Vancouver we rarely have snow, but I should send you pictures of our potholes on the designated bike streets. I joked the other day that with our potholes we really do need mountain bikes to get around the city here.