12 March 2009

How Far You Ride

Ages ago we posted the EU statistics about how far people in different countries ride on average each year. I found these updated statistics for 2007 through a fine blog about cycling in Vienna called Cycling is Good For You.

These stats are for 2006. They differ slightly compared to our post back in 2007. I can't figure out when the previous stats stats are from. May be 2006. Some numbers are up, some are down. Marginal differences though. Except Denmark now takes first place, up from second.

Anyway, stats are fun.

Denmark: 954 km
Netherlands: 879 km
Belgium: 329 km
Germany: 298 km
Sweden: 277 km
Finland: 256 km
Ireland: 186 km
Austria: 173 km
Italy: 159 km
Great Britain: 84 km
France: 81 km
Greece: 77 km
Luxembourg: 31 km
Portugal: 29 km
Spain: 27 km

Other countries outside of the EU:
Japan: 354 km
Switzerland: 287 km
Norway: 164 km
USA: 33 km

34 comments:

Karl McCracken (twitter: @karlonsea) said...

Yes indeed, stats are fun. Especially now that Great Britain is ahead of France. This is something to be truly proud of.

Adrienne Johnson said...

Hurray!!!! We beet Luxembourg!!

Ranger Bob said...

I'm from Portugal. Crap. :-(

Anonymous said...

The stats are depressing, the ad's clever. Ad wins.
Jack

Anonymous said...

Ah.ah.ah....my km in 2008 : 9017 km

8000 in Italy, 800 in Denmark in august and about 200 in Sweden in october...but nobody ask my average....Riccardo Italy

John Mayson said...

Wow! I'm in the USA and I ride about 3,200 km (2,000 miles) per year. Woo hoo!

lehommeaulevelo said...

Strange we are doing very well at Seventh (Ireland).

I know that a lot more People are Cycling now ,but I did not think we were as much. If only they would improve the Infrastructure,they are still Pandering to the Motoring lobby.

If they put in Proper Segregated Cycle Lanes more People would start Cycling again and also more School Children as it would be Safer fo them.

KC said...

Feels good to be bumping up the stats for the USA... I ride 45 km to get home from work every day... Yay for bicycle trails away from the road!

anna said...

Thanks for linking me ;-).

Maybe your stats are slightly older since in the newspaper article they say that Austrians have cycled 19km more than at the last survey which would exactly match your older number.. But well, don't really know how they even obtain these numbers. I just find it very alarming that the Netherlands lost nearly 150km, although Denmark is on top now.

Anonymous said...

There has to be differences by regions also. Here in Brussels almost noone bikes (the 'Velib' type bike share program was such a disaster that the ended up removing all the stations), but when you go out in Flanders, it is a different country. But even with that, I do not see how they can be ahead of Sweden or Germany :-(

Ryan (green.ryder) said...

That's pretty depressing but not unexpected to see where the USA sits (assuming Canada is the same).
Hardly anyone rides from late November to April.

I always heard that Spain was bad, but didn't know they were worse than over here.

KC said...

I never did understand that Ryan. Then again I guess the weather in the PNW is kind of special. I've been biking all year long and found it easier getting around than in a car, especially when it starts snowing. Biggest problem I have is that I have to get off the roads when it snows because no one knows how to drive, and bike components wearing out faster. That and Seattle's aversion to using salt creates a black ice problem.

Shaun McDonald said...

The average that Great Britain cycles, is a little more than half my average weekly cycle! It's a real shame I twisted my ankle last week, really missing the cycling.

didrik said...

I'm in the US. My yearly miles just going to and from work is 5,000 miles. This doesn't include errands and rides with friends. No idea what that would add up to.

Anonymous said...

Yes, my God, the Spaniards are worse than the Americans? I can believe it, though; it seems that every paved road in Spain has a car bombing along it, with absolutely no shoulder room for a cyclist.

They'll come around, though, as energy costs skyrocket and driving becomes an unaffordable luxury.

Anonymous said...

i'm too lazy to look - Australia rated anywhere there? I can't imagine it would be anything to write home about. still, new bike sales here topped cars again for about the third year straight.

Anonymous said...

"Yes, my God, the Spaniards are worse than the Americans? I can believe it, though; it seems that every paved road in Spain has a car bombing along it, with absolutely no shoulder room for a cyclist.

They'll come around, though, as energy costs skyrocket and driving becomes an unaffordable luxury.

04:45"

Believe or not, but i'm spanish and this is completely TRUE.

Oh, god... I wanna be danish...

Anonymous said...

I'm in rural USA and rode 2510 km in 2008. Most of it wearing a helmet AND a dress. Also last week had my first encounter with a road raging man in a monster truck who tried to run me off the road not once but twice, screaming that cyclists should ride on the sidewalk or they deserve to be roadkill. The cycling climate here is not like in Denmark but I continue to love riding every day, and hoping to see more improvement in relations between everyone who uses the road .... Meanwhile, your site is a good reminder that it really can be better.

Anonymous said...

I should add – I know a helmet can't protect me against people like that guy, but if I do get forced to crash into the curb I would rather hit it with my helmet than my skull. Just saying.

Anonymous said...

Oh, as a Spanish, I feel ashamed for those results. I cycle around 2000 km a year, but all along my daily bike ride, I only see 5 or 6 more cyclists. We are a small minority; Spanish don't use their bikes because they are not conscious. But there are other reasons that make me not to ride more. From May to October, here in Almería, temperature reaches 40 or 45 ºC; and nearly all the country has slopes, some of them very steep... It's not easy. Sorry for my English.

Anonymous said...

I'm from the US and hopefully my 1,480 miles this past year will bump the measly 33km up. Keep on pedaling!

Gustar Mono said...

Roughly ride 15 kms a day, which is 5500 kms annually, and more during weekend where I use to take cycling training as a sport.

But it's only my personal though, not national.

eulez said...

You can recognize a Spanish because we are always apologizing about our English and because of non-cycling point of view! (cycling is for poors, bohemians and communists) This is a cultural change we have to made in Spain. We are on it!

Anonymous said...

NPR just had a good story about why the average Spaniard doesn't ride bicycles, but kicks ass in the Grand Tours with riders such as Contador, Sastre, Pereiro, & Indurain. I'm American and I ride about 100 miles per week for work & pleasure. Sorry, I can't think in KM's. Even while biking in Europe I leave my GPS in miles. Cool stats!!! BIKES RULE!!!

Susana Ferreira Machado said...

Well, as Portuguese I am ashamed too, Ont he other hand having spent some time in Copenhagen, I rode more there in two weeks than in two years in Lisbon. The fact that 7% of the streets of Lisbon are made of steps might have something to do with that. It is a steep steep place to ride. I mean sure in the country you get to ride up and down rolling hills, but for da to day commute? I don't think so. Same thing for Montreal Canada where I've been living for a while. I commute by bike in the summer when I can, but 6 months of the year it is just too damn cold. And if you say it gets cold in CPH too, well, -5 and -30 there is a difference !

Mikael said...

there are many cities in europe and around the world with hills and cold winters where there are very high levels of cycling.

so hills and cold are no excuse.

Mike Rubbo said...

Mikael, These stats. are so useful. Do you happen to have compiled comparative figures, county by country, on amount spent on bike related infrastructure.

It would be very interesting to see how kms. ridden,now shown, correlates with such figures.

It might allow some some discoveries fo countries riding above or below their govt. spending, that is being out in front, or behind, their govt.

I's also like to see each spend as a percentage of general transport infrastucture spending. Mike

Ethan said...

OMG, the Americans beat someone?
Thank you, Lance Armstrong!

jt said...

Hey no Australia stats!?! We ride like there's no tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

IN YOUR FACE!!! .......aahhhhhhhh.... isn't there anyone below USA???

Mikael said...

Can't recall the exact stat for Australia but it is at about the same level as the USA.

Eileen said...

I'd love to see where Chile figures in there. We're developing a strong cycle commuting culture in Santiago ever since a transportation overhaul introduced lots of new commuting problems. See more details (in spanish) about cycling, critical mass rides, etc, at www.mfc.cl

Anonymous said...

Yeah for San Sebastian I commute by bike everyday. I rode down the 3/4 of the West Coast of the U.S. this year and no statistician asked me how far I ride annually...So we should only bump up the ladder...also I'm down in Chile now and trying to spread the word of the eases and joys of bicycle commuting during my exchange (look for the only fixie in Valparaíso)...so watch out, Chile's gonna climb up the list soon.

Anonymous said...

What method do they use to measure this?