28 March 2010

Bikerakk - I Used to Be a Car Tyre


Bikerakk is a New Zealand product - a bicycle rack made from steel and covered in a softer outer layer made from four used car tyres.

The rear wheel is a glass disk that can be used for signage.

To be honest, the production process seems to be a trifle overcomplicated just for a bike rack. A rubbery outer layer made of car tyres is a gimmick that doesn't serve much purpose unless you have some fancy, expensive wonderbike, which most people don't. Sheesh, if I was worried about scratches on my bicycles in this city, I would bubblewrap them and leave them in the cellar.

BUT... with all that said, it's symbolism, which we like here at Copenhagenize. It's the bicycle as a symbol in cities and towns. The more symbolism the better if we're to reestablish the bicycle as a feasible, respected and accepted transport form.

The Bikerakk is bold and oversized which is all the better. It's a sculptural addition to the cityscape. The "I used to be a car tyre" slogan serves to push the message even further. The company who produces them is negotiating with various city councils to implement the rack.

Thumbs up.

Bikerakk's website.

Thanks to Shane in NZ for the link to this article.

4 comments:

Eneko Astigarraga said...

Very interesting stuff. Good design and re-cycling materials. Chapeau!

Green Idea Factory said...

More advertising pollution!

Matt said...

I first thought that too, but I don't think it need necessarily be advertising pollution. The rear wheel, especially if two racks bookended normal bike racks, could be used for signage, like the name of a nearby metro station or the bike racks get a name of their own. Thus they become part of the urban geography.

But if it was used for some crappy product, it would be advertising pollution by my reckoning too.

Green Idea Factory said...

Matt: Dream on. The cities which are clued-in enough to not use this to counteract cycling would just use cheaper, lighter and less energy-intensive racks.

Check out the text on the product website: "Spokemedia" or "premium street sculpture" or "game changer". Sounds like another well-meaning designer who is totally clueless or loves advertising.