26 May 2010

Dublin Then and Now

Dublin Cycle Chic
Dublin Then. 1961 to be precise. On the Flickr photo page there was a discussion about what location this was.


Times Change by Ian, aka Inuitmonster on Flickr.

Dublin Now. This is a photo Ian took from the same location in Dublin.

Which do you prefer?

On the subject of Dublin, there'll be a cracking Cycle Chic party in June. Read more at Cycle Chic and enter Cycle Chic photos to the Flickr group to win tickets to the event.

5 comments:

Adam said...

I prefer the one with a functioning economy and actual jobs for its citizens, which I suppose is the latter. But yeah, there is no sensible reason for employed people to replace their bikes with automobiles.

Mikael said...

As far as I recall, the Irish economy was decent in the early 1960's. The clothes the people are wearing are clearly work clothes - presentable and fine - which would suggest they are heading off to jobs in a functioning economy.

Umemployed people don't usually participate in rush hour - whether two-wheeled or four. :-)

Herzog said...

Well, I love congestion, pollution, and danger so I'm not sure you want my opinion on this one.

Robert P said...

The original source for this photo states: 'Cyclists waiting for a green light in Dame St. at head of South Great Georges St. Dublin'.

See here: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/cushman/results/detail.do?query=dublin&page=1&pagesize=20&display=thumbcap&action=search&pnum=P12245

And the full Charles W Cushman collection is available here: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/cushman/

(Sorry- I'm a stickler for accurate attribution and citation on the internet. And Yes, my online life is an almost ceaseless series of disappointments! ;) )

Anonymous said...

Ireland is broke. Its economy was in better shape in the 60s. The period from the mid-90s until about 2006 saw massive economic growth that was initially real enough and then based on a farcical property bubble from about 2002-2006. The economy hasn't been worse since the 50s and the most productive cohort of workers is mostly saddled with enormous private debt and 300k-600k mortgages on very modest three-bedroom houses.

Due to the recession (bordering on a depression) and probably also due to a tide of fashion, cycling numbers are currently increasing in a promising way, after dropping consistently from the 80s onwards (the drop started earlier, but the oil crisis kept cycling numbers a little more buoyant than they would have been otherwise).

Incidentally, a lot of cycling infrastructure was built from the early 90s up till now, and was accompanied by consistent strong drops in cycling numbers. Mind you, the standards were abysmal. "Cyclists Dismount" is still one of the most common signs associated with cycling facilities, and cyclists on them always lose right of way at junctions, even very minor ones. They're largely ignored and the law that compels cyclists to use them is due to be repealed.