29 September 2010

No Ridiculous Car Journeys in Malmö, Sweden


The City of Malmö is located in the south of Sweden, just across the bridge from Copenhagen. It's Sweden's third-largest city.

The City's bicycle office and transport department are also quite brilliant at promoting cycling. In fact, I asked one of the communications people at the City of Copenhagen's Bicycle Office a while back who they were positively influenced by and he replied, "Malmö" without hestitation. Followed by the Dutch Fietsersbond. Which speaks volumes.

They have had a successful campaign running for four years now called "No Ridiculous Car Trips". They discovered a few years back that 50% of all trips under 5 km were by car in the city and they decided to do something about it.

The campaign has been a massive success. In the film, above, you can hear all about how and why the campaign started. I like how they turn the tables in their marketing. Directing confronting that very simple fact that using cars for short trips in their city was - ridiculous.

They invited people to write down a description of their short car trip in the hopes of winning the Most Ridiculous Car Trip title - and a new bicycle of course.
ingalojligabilresor_2009
The film is also a fine infomercial about the city and their visions of the future, including their goals for increasing bicycle traffic. In 1995, the modal share for bicycles was 20%. Today it is 30%. They increased their bicycle traffic by 1-2% each year. Brilliant. The reason for the increase is not just campaigns but also a sensible investment in separated bicycle infrastructure. The city now has around 420 km of bicycle infrastructure.

Textbook examples of how to promote cycling positively. Poster children for liveable cities. Wonderful.

Previous posts about bicycle culture in Malmö on Copenhagenize.com


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And a visit to our friends at Malmö/Lund Cycle Chic never hurts either.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Could they follow up with a "No Ridiculous Head Gear" campaign?

Brandt said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Brandt said...

I wish a campaign like that could be launched here in Miami, Florida. There have been so many bike lanes pooping up around here, but they are so underused - and there are definitely A LOT of ridiculous car trips here that can be done by bike.

Michael S said...

Wow, 30% is a bigger bicycle share than Copenhagen with 25%! I thought that many dutch cities and very few german ciities reach a share like that, but never expected a swedish city to achieve this.

townmouse said...

Great stuff and a great idea for a campaing. (I also think it helps that their traffic engineer looks like Santa Claus!)

Branko Collin said...

Heh, if you grow the modal share of bikes in an Anglo-Saxon city by 1 percentage point, you double it. :-)

James said...

I think ive got one, some kids at my school drove 175m because they couldn't be bothered to walk it. Me? It was too short to ride...

Jocko said...

Unfortunatly, the swedish lawmaking is not very Malmölized, this is a recent incident.

http://www.sydsvenskan.se/lund/article1252297/Pakord-cyklist-domdes---bilist-friad.html

Watch the road Nobelvägen on GoogleMaps, and you´ll see, there is hardly ANY bikelane at all!

Mikael said...

Michael S: Modal share in Copenhagen is 37%. Rising to 55% in the central part of the city.

Severin said...

As a native of malmo, I love reading this post :) Thanks for sharing!

Anonymous said...

The video says that 50% of all car trips in the city were under 5km, while the article says that 50% of all trips under 5km were by car. Big difference -- I'm guessing the video is correct here.

Anonymous said...

I use a car even for short trips because I feel much safer that way, so this health / enjoyment / embarrassment /enviro campaign would have had (has) no effect on my driving habits. I wonder if this is also true for others.

Driving in my car in the city there is almost no chance of being maimed or injured. Several of my friends and family members have been seriously injured driving bikes, however. I simply would never trust cars enough to share the road with them on a machine as vulnerable and exposed as a bike.

unless a city went entirely bike, I will never be driving a bike for short distances. I do walk when I can, though.