05 January 2011

Cycling in Winter in Copenhagen

Winter Copentraffic
Sometimes it's easier to let the photos do the talking. As mentioned before, 80% of Copenhageners cycle through the winter. That number is surely lower when we have hard winters with snowstorm after snowstorm, but the numbers are still impressive. Impressive to me. Probably astounding to others.

If you make the bicycle the fastest way to get from A to B in a city - what we call A2Bism for bicycles here at Copenhagenize - the strangest people will be spotted on bicycles. If you prioritize keeping your bicycle infrastructure clear of snow, people will ride.

In most of these shots the temperature was well below zero. Much lower with the typical Copenhagen wind.
Snowstorm Crowd
And no bicycle studs were harmed in the making of this blogpost. I never see them here and wouldn't possibly know where to buy them.

When you have as much urban cycling experience as the people of Copenhagen or a city like Amsterdam, you are pretty much trained to cycle in any weather. I'll just let my fellow citizens do the talking:
Snowstorm Evening Winter Traffic Copenhagen Cargo Bike
Winter Traffic Copenhagen Flat Cap Another Country

Winter Traffic Copenhagen Quartet Winter Traffic Copenhagen
Snowstorm Shopping Transport Snowstorm Headwind Mobile Chat
Snowstorm Boiler Suit Snowstorm Bundled
Muscle It Snowstorm Ploughing
Snowstorm Going Strong Snowstorm Red Light
Winter Traffic Copenhagen Sweater Snowstorm Backlight

Snowstorm Warm Snowstorm Cargo
Snowstorm Bike Lane Snowstorm Headwind 02
Winter Traffic Copenhagen Blue Snow Drifting
Copenhagen Winter Day Snowstorm Headwind 03

Winter Traffic

18 comments:

Flipper said...

I like those pictures!!!
Thanks for this post...

Tom said...

Awesome pics. I want to ride in those conditions! I love bikes & snow, it's perfect!

shuichi said...

I used to ride a bicycle in such a condition. Most high school students in countryside do ride bicycles every day while snow falls. Anyway, there are so much people riding in such a sever winter. Thanks.

Rebecca said...

Completely awesome and very similar to riding in the Alps in winter too - it's all possible. Gives us Brits a bit of a kick up the backside when we get a flurry of snow and the whole country comes to a complete standstill! Great post.

Neil said...

Nice pictures, still managing to fit in the snide remarks about equipment. I've done winters with and without studded tires. It's no different than buying winter tires for your car: all seasons are adequate, but you slide more and need more braking distance. Winter tires grip better and make driving (or riding in this case) much easier.

They're the only equipment I've bought specifically for winter biking, and I couldn't be more pleased with the purchase. Also, studs are nearly invisible, so you "not having seen them" says nothing one way or the other about whether they're used.

bikeolounger said...

If my commute was more urban, I could probably do with regular tires (or tyres, if you prefer--I live in the central part of the U.S.). However, my commute of thirteen or so miles is roughly half suburban, half rural, by comparison to the images you keep sharing with us (and by so doing, make us jealous) and the roads are not cleared nearly as well as the Copenhagen bike lanes (AGAIN with making us jealous! ;-) ). For the few weeks a year (cumulative) that we have icy roads, I'll rig a bike with studded tires and disc brakes.

I'd rather have three or four bikes in the garage than a car, anyway.

Emily said...

Those pictures do the talking in more ways than you think. I'm seeing a definite absence of hills. I haven't bought studded tires yet, but I'm fairly tempted, because I live at the top of a steep hill, and riding my bike down that when it's icy can be a little scary.

Lovely Bicycle! said...

I love the woman in the fur coat with blond hair in the first picture - iconic!

Anonymous said...

Whatever...
From MN

Anonymous said...

Ditto...
From AK

Doug said...

Looks darn flat. Ever tried riding uphill, or maintaining control going downhill in those type of conditions without studded tires? I ride everyday in the U.S. in some of the harshest winter conditions in the country. I couldn't do it without studded tires. I've been riding bicycles for 42 years. I am experienced.

Green Idea Factory said...

Hmm, seems that spiked tyres would be useful for some people...

blrovar said...

If you ride in Minsk, you better have 4 rows of studs.

Anonymous said...

I like the pic of the ninja. Cool.

Anonymous said...

I am a Brisbane boy living in Copenhagen and I cycle post for Post Denmark. Let me just say that yes Copenhagen is flat but the snow makes up for that, it is hard to cycle in and is very dangerous when it becomes compacted plus the the biggest problem is your hands get so cold you almost cry. All the same good pic's.

Jewish Cooking World said...

Really great pictures. Here in Winnipeg, where I live, the temperature during winter can dip well into minus 20 centigrades, and with the wind factor it is even lower. I have been riding my bike in winter occasionally, but the most I have done is -18 C. I think was pretty remarkable. It would be a matter of negotiating the streets (or the sidewalks) that in winter are virtually no used by humans). It is pretty flat, though, so this is an advantage, I guess. Again. Thank you for the inspiring, beautiful pictures.
Heydi

stararchitect said...

Hi !
I am an architecture student at the University of Manitoba and am in the process of completing a Masters of Interior Design degree here in Winnipeg, Canada.

The practicum project addresses the relationship between interior space and the urban environment through the design of an active transportation hub. A bike station for secure bike parking will occupy the hub and its functions will support cyclists, transit users and the surrounding community. The practicum examines the connections between placemaking and sustainable transportation in creating places of meaning and identity in a mobile society.

I would love to include some of these images as part of my document, hoping you could give me some direction as to who to contact?

Thanks!
Erika

stararchitect said...

Hi there-

I am an architecture student at the University of Manitoba and am currently in the process of completing a Masters of Interior Design degree here in Winnipeg, Canada.

My thesis project addresses the relationship between interior space and the urban environment through the design of an active transportation hub. A bike station for secure bike parking will occupy the hub and its functions will support cyclists, transit users and the surrounding community. The practicum examines the connections between placemaking and sustainable transportation in creating places of meaning and identity in a mobile society.

I would love to include some of these images as part of my document! I was hoping you could give me some direction as to who to contact?

Thanks!
Erika